Things Gone and Things Still Here (jette) wrote,
Things Gone and Things Still Here
jette

Credit Trends

At first, credit cards were whatever color the bank used for their logo, but usually with a white background. Then in the eighties, the "gold card" was introduced with higher spending limits than the "basic" card, and credit issuers tried hard to imbue their use with a false sense of status. Then came the "platinum" card, with even higher spending limits. Never mind that hardly anyone was issued the standard card anymore, it was "gold" for people with bad/starter credit, and "platinum" for the "good" people. Then came super-exclusive (meaning I don't personally have one) no-limit-at-all black cards.

Now the thing is issuing "simplicity" cards. Rather than upping the spending limit, they encourage not just spending, but further brand loyalty to your issuer by withdrawing funds from your account on the due date automatically or not charging you a late fee if you forget to send your payment in. They are white.


Someone who's more into economic trends than me please discuss the idea of credit card companies branding themeselves not by appealing to your need for status, but for your need for security and comfort and ease. I am wondering about the marketing of "simplicity" as a theme in a meta/current state of the Western world kind of way. Is this anything like hemlines going down? Is bird flu really going to kill us all? What will happen now that our credit cards are white again? It's anyone's guess.

....

Also, behold: you can upload a picture to your eljay straight from your computer without uploading it to a different url first - it just goes in your "scrapbook." (At least for paid members.) That's sort of nifty.


Meat Beat Manifesto on Saturday Night
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